GARDEN WRITER | DESIGNER

Painting

Added on by Carol Bucknell.

I've been painting in my spare time for years, mainly portraits and figurative stuff in oils. For the past few years I have focussed very much on building a house and developing a garden on Waiheke Island where I now live.  The island has a very strong artistic community and this has inspired me to take up my brushes again, more portraits perhaps and hopefully some botanical work. Here are some of my early paintings.

Bridget

Bridget

Miranda

Miranda

Progress on my garden

Added on by Carol Bucknell.

It's been awhile since I talked about my garden on Waiheke, I realise, nearly 18 months in fact.  Such a lot of changes since then, some areas flourishing, some having to be replanted when I realised the species I carefully propagated from seed couldn't cut it growing in a very damp, wastewater field (I'm talking about you rengarenga lilies!).  There have been some surprises too. South African plants like Dietes bicolor growing well in the same often boggy soil.  Who knew? My favourite hedging plant Murraya paniculata and the scented climber Stephanotis both prefer hot, sunny conditions yet they are thriving (fingers crossed) in an area that is very shady in winter. That's one of the joys of gardening, pushing the boundaries with plants you simply have to try to grow despite what the books say. 

Peacock blue neomarica bloom from spring to summer.

Peacock blue neomarica bloom from spring to summer.

I have to had to supplement the hundreds of plants I originally grew from cuttings and seed with a few from nurseries to fill gaps where other plants have failed. Oioi our wonderful native reed has been a winner as has the ground cover Coprosma Poor Knights.  Another native , the lovely grass Carex viragata also seems to thrive in the frequently wet soil in my garden.

Carex virgata soften the retaining wall, thriving the often damp gravel below.  The scented, white flowering Murraya paniculata will eventually form an informal hedge above. 

Carex virgata soften the retaining wall, thriving the often damp gravel below.  The scented, white flowering Murraya paniculata will eventually form an informal hedge above. 

Dietes robinsoniana love the north facing slope at the top of the garden.  This perennial seems to do well in the maritime climate of Waiheke Island. 

Dietes robinsoniana love the north facing slope at the top of the garden.  This perennial seems to do well in the maritime climate of Waiheke Island. 

My garden is still a work in progress. Even though Waiheke Island is part of Auckland City it has a different climate, much warmer and sunnier in summer.  And of course it is more exposed to salt laden winds which does affect some plants.  As time goes by I'll gain a better picture of the local environmental conditions. Until then it's a matter of trial and error, with a bit of good luck too. 

The magic of gardens

Added on by Carol Bucknell.

The ideal space must contain elements of magic, serenity, sorcery and mystery. (Luis Barragan)

Fuente de los Amentes by Luis Barragan

Fuente de los Amentes by Luis Barragan

I first saw photographs of Barragan’s gardens when I began studying landscape design many years ago at UNITEC. Until then most of the gardens I had seen had been quite traditional, both here and in England where I had lived for eight years. Barragan’s work and that of Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx, Martha Schwarz, Isabelle Palmer as well as New Zealanders like Ted Smythe, Trish Bartleet and many others gave me a new appreciation of garden design. I've been passionate about the subject ever since.

Working as a garden writer and designer is for me an ideal combination. Writing about gardens means I get to talk to and see the work of some of the country's most talented landscape designers. I intend to write more about some of their inspiring gardens in this blog.

I'll also provide updates on my own landscape design work, which I'm hoping to devote more time to in the future. Garden writing has been my chief focus for many years but now I would like to have more of a balance between the two.

Personal challenge

One of my most challenging landscape projects currently is the creation of my own garden on Waiheke Island. My husband Barry and I bought a piece of land there about a year ago with the aim of building a house, actually a modest shed but we like the idea of living in a small space. And it suits our budget.

We’re now nearing the end of the construction process and I am desperate to plant the garden before summer. All the residents of Waiheke harvest rainwater for domestic use, there is no mains supply, so water for the garden will be a precious commodity. Planting before the ground becomes very dry in the heat of summer is therefore essential.

The bare site prior to construction work.  It runs in a north/south direction and the photo is taken looking from the road.

The bare site prior to construction work.  It runs in a north/south direction and the photo is taken looking from the road.

My design for the garden obviously has to focus on drought tolerant plants, but many will have to be suitable for planting in a septic field (Waiheke also has no sewage system). This means they must be able to cope with reasonably high levels of nutrients and moisture in the ground.

When we first bought the property I decided to set myself the task of propagating as many of the plants for the garden as I could. With an 800 m² site this means lots of plants! I've had a year or so to do this and now have a flourishing nursery of flaxes, rengarenga, dietes and many other perennial ready to be planted.

Oioi, a native reed ideal for growing in a septic field (left) and Coprosma Poor Knights, a hardy native shrub that I grew from tiny seedlings. These are the only two groups of plants I've so far bought but will probably have to buy more once planting commences.  It's way cheaper however to buy very small plants as I did, and pot them up as they grow larger.  

Oioi, a native reed ideal for growing in a septic field (left) and Coprosma Poor Knights, a hardy native shrub that I grew from tiny seedlings. These are the only two groups of plants I've so far bought but will probably have to buy more once planting commences.  It's way cheaper however to buy very small plants as I did, and pot them up as they grow larger.  

A mix of dietes, flaxes, Indian hawthorn that I grew from tiny seedlings I found in a park, brachyglottis and dichroa (a form of hydrangea) cuttings. These are just a few of the plants I have in my nursery waiting to go into my new garden.

A mix of dietes, flaxes, Indian hawthorn that I grew from tiny seedlings I found in a park, brachyglottis and dichroa (a form of hydrangea) cuttings. These are just a few of the plants I have in my nursery waiting to go into my new garden.

Small Houses... Big Gardens?

Added on by Carol Bucknell.

The small house movement is getting bigger and bigger (excuse pun). I'm about to join it with a small house on Waiheke, although ours will five times larger than this one. Luckily the garden won't be tiny.

Could you live in a Tiny Home?

Andrew and Gabriella Morrison recently completed their home project, a 221 square feet / 20 square meter tiny house on wheels. The Morrissons spent around $33,000 to build their house, furniture and appliances included.
More images and a video

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